Welcome to the LabRoots blog, where you can catch up on all the exciting news from the company, as well as check out all the comings and goings of the team.

For the past decade in the US, the exploration of space has been gradually and forcefully expanding beyond NASA’s sphere of influence. Partly because of the end of the Cold War, and partly because of concerns about the federal deficits, the will to spend tax dollars on space missions has continued to wane. That vacuum has...

Resveratrol is a compound found in grape skin, peanuts, and red wine. It turns out that this healthy compound not only is good for the heart but also might make tumor cells more susceptible to radiation treatment. Researchers from the University Of Missouri School Of Medicine have studied the cancer-fighting benefits of Resveratrol and found that...

There has been a growing concern about the lack of regulation and the practice of giving antibiotics to livestock to minimize illness and enhance the animals’ growth. Just as people become resistant to antibiotics, when they are over-exposed to them, animals also build an antibiotic-resistance that makes mutated bacteria harder to eliminate. Due to the...

The ability to understand current health conditions and to learn what others might develop down the road is one of the biggest reasons that some people are getting excited about personalized genomics. Although genome sequencing isn’t anything new, making it available on a personal level is. At a cost that currently falls just below $10,000,...

For the first time, researchers have been successful at reprogramming an animal’s adult cells so that they can grow into various types of tissue. In Madrid, Spain, researchers at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre were successful at accomplishing in mice what had previously only been performed in a petri dish. This research leads to...

Recent experiments show progress toward the development of touch-sensitive prosthetic limbs. What makes these so advanced is their real-time interaction with the brain. Researchers at the University of Chicago are working on the sensory aspects of prosthetic limbs. Touch and pattern experiments with monkeys, who have sensory systems resembling humans, have shown that specific patterns of...

Chemicals in human brains are released to help us feel better after being rejected in a social situation. Researchers at the University of Michigan’s Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience Institute used brain-scanning techniques to track chemical release combined with social rejection testing to look at what is happening in the brain when a person is socially rejected....

The Chinese Red-Headed Centipede has potent venom that can block nerves in insects to allow the centipedes to prey on them. A molecule in this venom could potentially be used as a painkiller in humans, similar to morphine. Researchers from the University of Queensland’s Institute for Molecular Bioscience have demonstrated that centipede venom is loaded with...

The dance and science worlds collided recently when a study from London’s Imperial College showed that ballet dancers’ brains adapt to keep them from feeling dizzy while they perform pirouettes. According to the neuroscience study, years of ballet training enables a dancer to suppress signals to the brain originating from the balance organs located within the...

Sometimes, bigger really is better. A new scientific study from the University of Glasgow reveals that the human brain processes words that refer to big things faster than the words for small things. According to the study, when it comes to both concrete and abstract words, the brain will read and understand words that describe bigger...