Welcome to the LabRoots blog, where you can catch up on all the exciting news from the company, as well as check out all the comings and goings of the team.

Given my sister’s history, I often wished she had Down syndrome. I’m sure that sounds odd, but when I was a kid, not to me. Jill was found to have Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS), a genetic disorder that bestows odd facial features and a small head, small stature, profuse body hair, heart problems, difficulty with...

A new wrinkle in federal funding for disputed gain-of-function studies (GOF) in which pathogens are modified to make them lethal or easier to transmit—the White House is putting funding on hold while experts craft a government-wide policy for evaluating the risks. The funding “pause,” says a White House blog (from the Office of Science and Technology...

Researchers seeking a cure for Type 1 diabetes may be a giant step closer to the prize. For most people with this chronic condition, the immune system goes awry, destroying insulin-producing (islet) cells in the pancreas. When a substantial number of these cells are wiped out, little or no insulin is produced. With no insulin to...

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), 1.4 million people could contract the Ebola virus by January. In West Africa alone 2,800 lives have been lost to the dreaded disease. For two students at Emory University in Atlanta, the problem was even more real.  Ambulances went by their biology classroom to transport three Ebola patients...

With all the doom and gloom about climate change and vanishing species, it’s sometimes nice to hear about an environmental success story. Here’s one. According to recent research from the University of Washington, the California blue whale population is back to near historic levels. Once hunted nearly to extinction, this is the only population of...

Please take these carrots away. I can’t stop eating them! Do you think you might ever say that? Or will that statement always only apply to chips? A study published recently in Nutrition & Diabetes indicates that you might b able to train your brain to like healthy foods instead of unhealthy ones. Scientists at Tufts...

For those of you who don’t subscribe to The Hollywood Reporter, I’m going to synergize vital news you may have missed with a longitudinal study shared by a professional society of neuroscientists. First, THR. In January, the entertainment trade pub reported the Bravo cable network’s “Real Housewives” franchise hit an all-time high (marking the most-watched night...

Researchers from the Salk Institute, La Jolla, Calif, have found that a manmade derivative of vitamin D caved-in the seemingly impervious wall of cells barricading pancreatic tumors, cleaving a gap in which to pump cancer-fighting drugs. The findings, from animal studies, have led to human trials. The dismal five-year survival rate for this type of cancer—lowest among...

Artificial sweeteners, put forth as a panacea for weight loss and diabetes prevention, may instead spur our chances of developing glucose intolerance and metabolic disease by altering the workings of gut microbiota – the large group of bacteria in our intestines, according to an interesting and much-discussed study. The findings are published in the journal Nature. Glucose...

Poet and philosopher G.K. Chesterton once said: “One sees great things from the valley; only small things from the peak.” And this couldn’t be more true for a team of researchers led by palebiologist Richard Norris of Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, who together embarked upon unveiling the mystery of Death Valley’s ‘sailing...