July 2014

What can we do with a retired anti-tank Javelin missile-detector? Apparently we can use it to identify malaria parasites in blood. The detector is meant for sensing Javelin heat-seeking missiles and contains a focal plane array that gives specific information on a target area in minutes. Research published in the journal Analyst shows that this...

A paper by Massachusetts General Hospital researchers that was recently published in Science, revealed a method that with a simple blood draw, could allow personalized treatment of a patient’s cancer.  In this method a blood sample is taken and the cancer cells are isolated, placed in a laboratory dish, and experimented with to find which...

Scientific advances are bringing the time closer to when personalized approaches will become more common in treating illnesses. Medicines would take into account the patient’s history, disease risk and pathology and be tailor-made to be most effective for that specific patient. But, slowing the developments of these therapies is today’s clinical trial process, which has...

Our internal biological clock (or circadian clock) plays an important role in regulating the daily rhythms of human behavior and biology. The human circadian clock enables maximum expression of genes at appropriate times of day to help the body adapt to the earth’s rotation. Desynchronization of the clock with the environment can affect physiological performance...

The Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO) and the Massachusetts Biotechnology Council (MassBio) commended Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick for signing legislation yesterday designed to create a pathway for the substitution of interchangeable biologic medicines. The policies outlined in House Bill 3734 align withall five of BIO’s principles on biologic substitution. BIO and MassBio commended Massachusetts’s Senate and House of...

Zombies are enjoying a recent surge in popularity, but our interest in them spans centuries. Their origins trace back to the folklore of tribes in Western Africa. Can our current interest in zombies be used to educate about public health infrastructure and the spread of infectious disease? Melissa Nasiruddin, Monique Halabi, Alexander Dao, Kyle Chen,...

Worrying about skin cancer appears more effective in getting people to wear sunscreen than disease statistics, a new study from the University of Buffalo finds. Research on whether people use sunscreen or not usually tends to focus on education and what information people have read about and retain. Now, it seems worrying about the potential of...